Friendship – Apr 17

Friendship

Socratic Conversation with Ron Gross

Thursday, April 17, 4-5:15pm

Please arrive by 3:45.pm

 

Gottesman Library, Teachers College
525 West 120th St.  – between Broadway & Amsterdam Avenues, north side of street 
#1 train to 116th St.
RSVP to grossassoc@aol.com and http://www.meetup.com/Conversations-New-York/events/176548712/

 

A photo ID is required for admission to building.
PLEASE ARRIVE BY 3:45.
There will be a display of relevant books.
Coffee and refreshments can be purchased as you enter the Library.


Please come to share our experiences, understanding, and questions, including:

(1)What kind of friend do you try to be?

(2)What do you seek from your friends?

(3)Does friendship “just happen” and “grow naturally” –

or are there skills and techniques that can be helpful?

What’s one you’ve learned?

(4)Is friendship different at different stages of life?

(5)Do women’s and men’s friendships differ? How?

(6)How do you feel about re-connecting with old friends  with whom you have lost touch,  via Internet searching or other means?

(7) Are your friendships affected by digital technologies?

(Those Facebook “Friends”…)

(8) What is one of your favorite portrays of friendship in literature, movies, TV, or other genres?  (Like Friends,  Seinfeld, or….?)

(9)What happens when friendships change, falter, or fail?

 

Optional Reading:
Available free on-line:
Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics: Book VIII
Michael de Montaigne, On Friendship

Other:
Jacques Derrida, The Politics of Friendship
Steve Duck, Friends,For Life: The Psychology  of Personal Relationships
Joseph Epstein, Friendship: An Expose

Next Socratic Conversation: Thursday, 5/29.

Steven Mandis on “What Happened to Goldman Sachs: An Insiders’s Story” – Dec 13

“Steven Mandis on What Happened to Goldman Sachs:  An Insiders’s Story of Organizational Drift and its Unintended Consequences.”

This lecture is offered by the Museum of American Finance.  An audience Q/A follows the lecture and after the Q/A, we will have a “TalkAbout” on what we heard in the atrium next door, 60 Wall St.

Kindly RSVP at http://www.meetup.com/Conversations-New-York/events/154126402/

Agenda
12 pm       Meet at inside entrance of  Museum of American Finance
1:30 pm   Meet at 60 Wall St. Atrium for “TalkAbout”

We will meet at the museum entrance at noon.  The discounted admissions fee is $5 (normally $8).  The fee includes access to the museum.  http://www.moaf.org/index  (Attendees are welcome to tour the museum on their own before or after the TalkAbout. Bring your own lunch because we are permitted to eat lunch during the lecture as this is one of the museum’s “Lunch and Learn Series”.)

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60 Wall St. Atirium

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“Are You Too Self-Critical?….or, Over-Confident? Do Men and Women Differ?” – June 20

Are You Too Self-Critical?

Or, Over-Confident?

Do Men and Women Differ?Thursday, June 20, 3:45 – 5:00 pm
Gottesman Library, Teachers College, 525 West 120th St., Second Floor
(Between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenues — 116th St./Columbia University stop on the #1 train)
Hosted by Ron GrossRSVP at http://www.meetup.com/Conversations-New-York/events/122481962/

Please join us to share your experiences, reflections, and insights.

  • Do women tend to be more self-critical of themselves, and do men tend to be too self-flattering?
  • A generation after the feminist revolution, are women still, on average, less confident than men? Are there differences in the assertiveness of women in classroom situations, and in work and family roles?
  • In our professional lives, is there a confidence gap between men and women?
  • Is self-criticism undervalued in our culture, in favor of assertiveness?
  • Which causes more problems — in personal life, professional life, and political life — overconfidence or underconfidence?
  • How can we best meld self-criticism and self-promotion?

These important questions were posed recently by David Brooks, author of The Social Animal and a regular Op-Ed columnist for The New York Times, who invited his readers — and us — to respond. We will — and we’ll review the most interesting responses he has received so far.

There will be a display of relevant books. Light refreshments will be available.

Next session: Thursday, Thursday, July 11th, 3:45 pm

For more information: www.SocratesWay.com/join.html

“Are You Too Self-Critical?….or, Over-Confident? Do Men and Women Differ?” – June 20

Are You Too Self-Critical?

Or, Over-Confident?

Do Men and Women Differ?Thursday, June 20, 3:45 – 5:00 pm
Gottesman Library, Teachers College, 525 West 120th St., Second Floor
(Between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenues — 116th St./Columbia University stop on the #1 train)
Hosted by Ron Gross

RSVP at http://www.meetup.com/Conversations-New-York/events/122481962/

Please join us to share your experiences, reflections, and insights.

  • Do women tend to be more self-critical of themselves, and do men tend to be too self-flattering?
  • A generation after the feminist revolution, are women still, on average, less confident than men? Are there differences in the assertiveness of women in classroom situations, and in work and family roles?
  • In our professional lives, is there a confidence gap between men and women?
  • Is self-criticism undervalued in our culture, in favor of assertiveness?
  • Which causes more problems — in personal life, professional life, and political life — overconfidence or underconfidence?
  • How can we best meld self-criticism and self-promotion?

These important questions were posed recently by David Brooks, author of The Social Animal and a regular Op-Ed columnist for The New York Times, who invited his readers — and us — to respond. We will — and we’ll review the most interesting responses he has received so far.

There will be a display of relevant books. Light refreshments will be available.

Next session: Thursday, Thursday, July 11th, 3:45 pm

For more information: www.SocratesWay.com/join.html

CREATIVE AGING: New Ways to Thrive and Contribute Throughout Our Ever-Longer Life-Spans – May 30

CREATIVE AGING:
New Ways to Thrive and Contribute
Throughout Our Ever-Longer Life-Spans

Thurs., May 30, 3:45 sharp — 5:15 pm sharp
Gottesman Library, Teachers College, 525 West 120th St.

RSVP at http://www.meetup.com/Conversations-New-York/events/121003972/

Socrates himself reached the peak of his powers at the age of 70 (not an easy feat in those days) – and he would have continued growing, learning, and ‘kicking butt’ if he hadn’t been sentenced to death by hemlock!

  1. Do you have concerns about the future well-being of the elders in your life – your parents or grandparents? Are we victims of “Ageism” — stereotyping people on the basis of their age?
  2. Are you now or do you anticipate sharing responsibility for an elders’ quality-of-life?
  3. Are you aware that your own eventual “successful aging” will depend importantly on some things you do now? (“If I’d known I was going to live so long, I would have taken better care of myself.”)

At this Conversation we will share our experiences with aging and with those elders who have touched our lives.

Please come to share your experiences and reflections:

What does Aging mean to you?

Do you feel that there are stereotypes, prejudices, and social practices that harm older adults (“Ageism”)?

What are your concerns for and about the elders in your life?

What do you hope will characterize your own later years, in terms of life-style, activities, opportunities, and supports?

Light refreshments will be available. There will be a display of relevant publications.

Suggested optional reading:

The Third Chapter, Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot (Sarah Crichton Books, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York 2009)

CREATIVE AGING: New Ways to Thrive and Contribute Throughout Our Ever-Longer Life-Spans – May 30

CREATIVE AGING:
New Ways to Thrive and Contribute
Throughout Our Ever-Longer Life-Spans

Thurs., May 30, 3:45 sharp — 5:15 pm sharp
Gottesman Library, Teachers College, 525 West 120th St.

RSVP at http://www.meetup.com/Conversations-New-York/events/121003972/

Socrates himself reached the peak of his powers at the age of 70 (not an easy feat in those days) – and he would have continued growing, learning, and ‘kicking butt’ if he hadn’t been sentenced to death by hemlock!

  1. Do you have concerns about the future well-being of the elders in your life – your parents or grandparents? Are we victims of “Ageism” — stereotyping people on the basis of their age?
  2. Are you now or do you anticipate sharing responsibility for an elders’ quality-of-life?
  3. Are you aware that your own eventual “successful aging” will depend importantly on some things you do now? (“If I’d known I was going to live so long, I would have taken better care of myself.”)

At this Conversation we will share our experiences with aging and with those elders who have touched our lives.

Please come to share your experiences and reflections:

What does Aging mean to you?

Do you feel that there are stereotypes, prejudices, and social practices that harm older adults (“Ageism”)?

What are your concerns for and about the elders in your life?

What do you hope will characterize your own later years, in terms of life-style, activities, opportunities, and supports?

Light refreshments will be available. There will be a display of relevant publications.

Suggested optional reading:

The Third Chapter, Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot (Sarah Crichton Books, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York 2009)

Socratic Conversation: The School-To-Prison Pipeline: The Effects of “Zero Tolerance” Policies with Natalie Millman, Thursday, March 14th

Socratic Conversation:

The School-To-Prison Pipeline: The Effects of “Zero Tolerance” Policies with Natalie Millman, Thursday, 3/14, 4:45 to 6pm
Where:  Columbia University NY (RSVP to Natalie Millman at NatMillman@gmail.com – required to obtain exact location / address AND at http://www.meetup.com/Conversations-New-York/events/108095812/)

CARTOON-school-2prison

Schools and prisons, at first glance, may appear to have nothing to do with each other. However, “zero tolerance” policies instituted at schools around the country serve to funnel ‘dangerous’ students into prisons. Excessive policing, unequal sentencing, and the expansion of prisons all play a role in this phenomenon.

We will be addressing several questions during this conversation.
What knowledge do you have about this phenomenon from your own experience(s) or studies?

What do you think is more valuable – protecting law-abiding children or investing resources into rehabilitative services?

What would you like to see happen on a national, state, or local level concerning zero tolerance policies and excessive policing in schools?
What can we ourselves do to address the problem?

Suggest optional reading: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/20/denver-school-to-prison-pipeline_n_2725816.html

http://colorlines.com/archives/2013/02/in_2012_florida_arrested_12000_students_in_school–and_that_was_an_improvement.html

***
Inspired by Socrates’ famous conversations with his friends in the marketplace of 5th century Athens, we engage in spirited discussions of ideas and issues. Socratic conversations range broadly and probe deeply into the basic challenges of life. They are informed by the latest literature for reference and follow up. While building a sense of community on campus, these meetings enliven the intellectual atmosphere and model dialogue and discussion as modes of inquiry. They are part of a year long series of Socratic Conversations hosted by the Gottesman Libraries.

This highly-participatory Conversation will be conducted by Natalie Millman, MSW student at Columbia University School of Social Work. Natalie lives in Manhattan and works as an advocate for a variety of issues; her practice specialty is in health and disabilities with an interest in the aging population. Amongst other activities, Natalie teaches writing classes in Manhattan and has facilitated formal conversations for groups since May 2012.

Next session: Thursday, 3/28, Topic: America’s Direction: What Values & Whose Interests Should Guide Our Choices?

Follow CNY at http://www.conversationsnewyork.com.
Like us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/conversationsnewyork.
Want to Join the CNY team?: We have opportunities for professionals with relevant skills to contribute pro bonoto the development of CNY in several important areas:

Editorial
Calendar-development
Funding
Media Relations/Social Networking
Venue-finding and Evaluation
IT/Operations
Legal
We are also seeking organizational partners and funding, from public and private agencies who share our interest in fostering a richer cultural life in NYC.

RELATIONSHIPS: What We All Need to Know But Are Afraid to Ask – February 28

RELATIONSHIPS

What We All Need to Know But Are Afraid to Ask
(The Statler Grill was kind enough to reserve 3 tables in a quiet room for us.  No purchases are required although The Statler would greatly appreciate your patronage.  Separate checks available on request.)

Thursday, February 28, RSVP and details at  http://www.meetup.com/Conversations-New-York/events/104568392/

Join us for food, drinks, and discussion.
Bring your questions and collective wisdom.
Each table votes for favorite a relationship question.
Short social before and in between rounds
–Greet old friends and meet new ones.

6:30 pm  Social
7:00  First Round
8:30  Second Round
9:30+ Continue conversations on your own

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0 Sad Cookie Monster

CONVERSATIONS NEW YORK

picture-of-conversation

Imagine…

Hundreds of New Yorkers coming together in small groups of neighbors and fellow citizens to discuss topics of intensive interest…
Hosted at no cost and at convenient locations and times…
Aided by simple guiding principles…
Inspired by the city’s grand tradition of robust conversation…
Our vision is to inspire, organize, publicize, facilitate and celebrate a renaissance of healthy dialogue in New York City.

Join us!

How You Can Help Us Grow!

If you would like to easily add to our strength, we’d be grateful for your taking these easy steps:
1.  Visit us at https://conversationsnewyork.com/ to learn more about us, subscribe to our website, and spread the word.
2.  Share with us your reactions, questions, and suggestions about this venture.  conversationsnewyork@gmail.com
3. ”Like” our organization on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ConversationsNewYork and join   http://www.meetup.com/Conversations-New-York/
4.  Consider convening a Conversation yourself – https://conversationsnewyork.com/resources-for-moderators-2/
5.  Tell us about Conversations you think should be listed on our on-line calendar.  https://conversationsnewyork.com/calendar-of-conversations/
We hope you’re as excited as we are about promoting and encouraging stimulating conversations in New York City!

The “Talk-About” — a new opportunity for conversations for theater-going New Yorkers

The “Talk-About” — a new opportunity for conversations for theater-going New Yorkers

Here’s something you might want to try, to enhance an upcoming night at the theater: we call it the “Talk About”!

This new kind of New York Conversation “opened” Off-Broadway at the SOHO Theater recently.    After a performance of Ingenious Nature,* eight playgoers gethered to share their reactions to the provocative work over drinks downstairs in the theater’s bar.

“It was great fun to hear what other people saw in it,” said Julie Epstein.  Another participant, Frank Purcell, said: “I found it  fascinating and illuminating”.   “Everyone’s looking for love, or sex, occasionally even both,” said a third discussant.  “It was fascinating to hear about some ways that the science of evolutionary psychology can help us find either– or even both!”

Convenor Ron Gross of CNY explains that “the  ‘Talk-About’  is a new wrinkle on the ‘Talk-Backs‘  that have become a familiar feature of New York theater, especially Off-Broadway”. “Such a conversation  enhances the experience of a night at the theater, by enriching your own experience as you share it with others.  You get to  review  the show from other peoples’ perspectives.”

So how about trying it on YOUR next night at the theater?   You can announce it on our calendar like this sample listing which appeared on Feb. 1st:

Discuss ‘All’s the Rage’  (title of your conversation)

Will you be attending  the show “All’s the Rage”, playing at the Peter Jay Sharp Theater on Saturday evening, Feb. 2nd?  We’d love to share reactions afterwards.   If you’re interested in joining us for a brief conversation about  this provocative play, meet us in the lobby as it lets out and we’ll adjourn to a suitable venue  in the building  or on the same block.  One of us will be wearing a yellow beret.

Sue Salko and Ron Gross

OR: Just type up half-a-dozen invitations** and leave a blank space for the location;  get to the theater  half-an-hour early to scout out a bar, pizza place, or other convenient venue; then keep your eye peeled during intermission for audience members who look like they might be interested!

* Ingenious Nature was a theatrical mix-tape, written and performed by Baba Brinkman, the Canadian rap artist, writer, and creator of  The Rap Guide to Evolution (2011 Drama Desk Award Nominee).

** Suggested text: 

Dear Fellow Theater-Goer:

Would you like to talk about the show afterwards?  We’d love to share reactions!  We’ll meet after the show let’s out, at NAME & ADDRESS.   (These “Talk Abouts” are promoted by Conversations New York — http://www.conversationsnewyork.com.)

 (Signed)  YOUR NAME

Welcome to Conversations New York!

Imagine…

Hundreds of New Yorkers coming together in small groups of neighbors

and fellow citizens to discuss topics of intensive interest…

Hosted at no cost and at convenient locations and times…

Aided by simple guiding principles…

Inspired by the city’s grand tradition of robust conversation…

Our vision is to inspire, organize, publicize, facilitate and celebrate

a renaissance of healthy dialogue in New York City.

Prospectus

This website is in beta-testing.  Please send us any constructive feedback and event recommendations to conversationsnewyork@gmail.com