Please join us to celebrate the National Week of Conversation, April 25th, 6-8 pm, in Bryant Park

From: Ron Gross

Hi, CNY members,

We’re only about 3 weeks away from spearheading NYC’s celebration of the first-ever National Week of Conversation (NWOC), in Bryant Park on the evening of April 25th. Our invitation is attached, containing information about the topics, location, transportation, sponsors, and the participants’ pledge to “Listen First”; please share it with friends if you like.

This campaign has gained exciting momentum. Over 70 organizations around the country are our partners in the movement; here in NY we’ve been joined by the Union Theological Seminary and others.

If you are not already registered, please do so with one-click at the link below. You’ll be warmly welcomed to healthy conversations where listening and learning will take precedence over arguing and grandstanding. Come to share your experiences, thoughts, values, and feelings on divisive issues on which we need to better understand one another.

Pre-registration & Pledge REQUIRED.docx

Celebrating LOVE at our successful move to Park Avenue!

Conversations New York celebrated LOVE on Valentine’s Day as we re-located our monthly meetings to the penthouse Faculty Dining Room at Hunter College on Park Avenue and 68th Street.

Sixty lively-minded New Yorkers shared their experiences, thoughts, and feelings, informed by “10 Things You Might Not Know About Love” by Prof. Barbara Friedrickson.

Among the unanimous enthusiastic reactions was this one from culture blogger Ellen de Marco: “I didn’t know what I thought until I heard what I said! And hearing from others stimulated my thinking in new directions. These CNY conversations offer new ideas, practical information, and inspiration.”

The next monthly meeting, on TRUST, will be on Wed., March 14th, by registration on the attached notice. I hope to greet you there!

RON

Ronald Gross
Co-chair, University Seminar on Innovation
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY
http://universityseminars.columbia.edu/
516 487-0235 (E-mail preferred)
E-MAIL: GrossAssoc

WEBSITES:
www.SocratesWay.com
www.ConversationsNewYork.com
www.OlderBetterWiser.com
www.RonaldGross.com

TRUST — short flyler.docx

“TRUST”: Wed., Mar. 14, Hunter College, 5:45 pm — our next CNY Conversation

WHERE CAN WE PLACE OUR

TRUST?

…in our personal relationships,

…among political figures,

…when needing healthcare,

…among alternative news/opinion media,

…in spiritual matters,

and…?

Conversations New York Monthly Meeting

Wednesday, March 14th, 2018

6:00 pm sharp (please arrive by 5:45) – 8:00

Hunter College, 695 Park Avenue,

Entrance at the intersection of Lexington Ave. and 68th St.

Faculty/Staff Dining Room, 8th floor

FREE, of course.

To reserve a place, please register at

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/where-can-we-place-our-trust-tickets-43052475112

Government-issued ID required for entry to building, please.

Please come chare your thoughts, experiences, feelings, and wisdom! Here are some of the questions we may discuss:

1. How “trusting” are you, in general? Do you ever err in being too trusting, or not trusting enough – and in what kinds of situations?

2. Can you share a notable high or low point in your life-experiences of trusting in others?

3. How do we first learn to trust? Where does our capacity to trust come from (Erik Erikson considered Trust to be the first stage in every infant’s development.)

4. How does trust help us make life predictable, create a sense of community, and facilitate social and economic relationships?

5. What has happened to our trust in our institutions and public figures? In our newspapers, magazines, and on TV?

6. When trust is lost, can it be regained? If so, how?

7. How can we avoid misplaced trust, gullibility, credulity, and other weaknesses in how we place our trust. (“In God we trust – all others pay cash.”)

Mobile Tickets
Contact the Organizer

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Ronald Gross
Co-chair, University Seminar on Innovation
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY
http://universityseminars.columbia.edu/
516 487-0235 (E-mail preferred)
E-MAIL: GrossAssoc@aol.com

WEBSITES:
http://www.SocratesWay.com
http://www.ConversationsNewYork.com
http://www.OlderBetterWiser.com
http://www.RonaldGross.com

“Understanding LOVE”: Wed., 2/14, 5:45 pm, Hunter College, 695 Park Ave.

You are warmly invited to join us to celebrate LOVE as we “move on uptown” — to the penthouse Faculty Dining Room at Hunter College on Park Avenue, where we will be holding our monthly meetings from now on.


We’ll be welcoming exciting new people, tackling even richer and more relevant issues, and enjoying new ways to truly think together (this time, the “World Cafe” model which enables you to meet twice as many other new friends during the evening).

I’m looking forward to seeing you there! Please register via EventBrite as below…

Understanding LOVE

Conversations New York (CNY)

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Valentine’s Day

6:00 pm sharp (please arrive by 5:45) – 8:00

Hunter College, 695 Park Avenue,

Entrance at the intersection of Lexington Ave. and 68th St.

Faculty/Staff Dining Room, 8th floor

Please see Directions at end

FREE, of course.
To reserve a place, please register at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/understanding-love-tickets-41925375928

Government-issued ID required for entry to building, please.

Please come share your
life-experiences, thoughts, feelings, and insights.

· What does love mean, to you?
· What have you learned about loving wisely and well?
· How is love different for men and for women, for gay and straight folks, and for others – or is it essentially the same for all?
· How does the meaning of love change as we get older?
· What are the connections, for you, between love and sexuality?
· Is love “natural” – or is it “socially-constructed”?
· How is love effected by politics, class, and money?
· Does loving make us healthier?
· What’s one of your favorite works of art about Love (movie, play, poem, picture, song….)?

To stimulate your thinking: Read the brilliant entry on LOVE at Wikipedia.org, covering the scientific, cultural, religious, and psychological knowledge about the subject.

DIRECTIONS:
Subway Directions:The 6 train stops directly under the College at the 68th Street station. There is an entrance to the College in the Subway station. Turn right upon exiting the turnstile and the entrance will be directly in front of you.
Alternatively: You can take the F train to the East 63rd Street and Lexington Avenue stop. After exiting the station, walk north on Lexington Avenue to East 68th Street. The College is located at the intersection of East 68th Street and Lexington Avenue.
Bus Directions: The crosstown M66 bus goes east on 68th Street, and west on 67th Street. Hunter College is located at the intersection of East 68th Street and Lexington Avenue.The M98, M101, M102, and M103 go south on Lexington Avenue and north on 3rd Avenue. Hunter College is located at the intersection of East 68th Street and Lexington Avenue.
Driving: See detailed directions at: http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/abouthunter/maps/68th-street-main-campus

“The Human Lifecycle”: Mon., Jan. 22, 7 pm, Faculty House, Columbia University

Just a friendly final notice/reminder….

The Columbia University Seminars on
Innovation in Education
and
Ethics, Moral Education, and Society
Present
The Human Lifecycle: Cross-Cultural Perspectives
Speakers: Uwe P. Gielen and SungHun Kim
St. Francis College, Brooklyn Heights
Monday, January 22nd, 2018, 7 pm,
Faculty House, Columbia University

RSVP to GrossAssoc@AOL.com
Our Seminar has regularly focused on the life-cycles we all experience, but so far only in the context of our own familiar cultural and societal milieu. Now, we want to better understand those “passages” by comparison with those of humans in several non-western societies, differing in their subsistence and economic activities, demographic characteristics, and exposure to the forces of globalization.
How might the journey of your life be different if you had been born, raised, and came to maturity in a radically different culture?
The societies include:
· Australian Aborigines (i.e., nomadic foragers in the early stages of settling down during the 1960s),
· Tibetan traditional, nomadic pastoralists during the 1930s-1940s,
· Buddhist Ladakhi farmers and monks in NW India (1979-1980), and
· 21st century South Koreans who are members of a postindustrial “information society”.
The presentation will include comparisons between pre-industrial societies and modern societies, together with insights from the diverse experiences of:
· childhood and adolescence,
· gender roles,
· religious conceptions of the afterlife, and
· the personal challenges that come with rapid social change and globalization.
Dr. Uwe P. Gielen received his Ph.D. in social psychology from Harvard University, has edited/coedited 27 books mostly in the area of international psychology, and is the Executive Director of the Institute for International and Cross-Cultural Psychology at St. Francis College.
Dr. SungHun Kim graduated from the University of Seoul, South Korea and subsequently received a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from the University of Texas at Austin. He teaches cross-cultural psychology and various methdology courses at St. Francis College. One of his main interests concerns the study of morality from a cross-cultural perspective.

Ronald Gross

Co-chair, University Seminar on Innovation

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY
http://universityseminars.columbia.edu/
516 487-0235 (E-mail preferred)

E-MAIL: GrossAssoc@aol.com

WEBSITES:

http://www.SocratesWay.com

http://www.ConversationsNewYork.com

http://www.OlderBetterWiser.com

http://www.RonaldGross.com

Directions to Faculty House copy.pdf