HAPPIER ENDINGS – How Have We, How Do We, and How Should We Handle the Endings in All Our Lives? – April 25

HAPPIER ENDINGS –
How Have We, How Do We, and How Should We
Handle the Endings in All Our Lives?

Socratic Conversation with Ron Gross

Gottesman Library, Teachers College, Columbia University
525 West 120th St.
(bet. Broadway and Amsterdam Ave. North side of 120th Street.)
(#1 train to 116th St.)

RSVP instructions at http://www.meetup.com/Conversations-New-York/events/111831812/
Please bring a photo ID required for entry to the building.
Thursday, April 25, 3:45 – 5:15 pm

There will be a display of relevant books.
Light refreshments will be available.
Coffee and other beverages available downstairs as you enter the building.

As this academic term concludes and we bid farewell (or au revoir) to classmates, teachers, and colleagues, we’ll gather to share what we’ve experienced, and what we’ve learned, from the inevitable goodbyes that occur in all our lives.

We’ll consider finales big and small, ordinary and extraordinary, sudden and protracted, painful and liberating — based on the book EXIT: The Endings That Set Us Free, by Harvard professor Sara Lawrence Lightfoot,

We’ll draw from our personal lives, but we’ll also ponder the social and economic conditions which make Exiting a pervasive part of American lives today, as so many of us experience such radical changes as divorce, migration or immigration, and the need or desire to change jobs or careers.

“Our exits are often ignored or invisible,” writes Lightfoot. At this session, we’ll focus on how we might turn them into endings that set us free.

Inspired by Socrates’ famous conversations with his friends in the marketplace of 5th century Athens, we engage in spirited discussions of ideas and issues. Socrates ended his life with one of the most notable Goodbye’s in history: his famed Apology to his fellow citizens at his trial for treason.

Our Socratic Conversations range broadly and probe deeply into the basic challenges of life. They are informed by the latest literature for reference and follow up. While building a sense of community on campus, these meetings enliven the intellectual atmosphere and model dialogue and discussion as modes of inquiry. They are part of a year long series of Socratic Conversations hosted by the Gottesman Libraries, and are conducted by Ron Gross, author of Socrates Way (www.socratesway.com/join.html) and co-chair of the University Seminar on Innovation in Education at Columbia (www.columbiaseminar.org)

PLEASE NOTE: Since the Conversations are mainly for members of the Columbia University community, please downplay coming via any other connection.

NEXT SESSION: Thursday, 4/11, Topic: Generational Patterns of Familial Child Abuse with Natalie Millman,
Thursday, 4/18, Topic: CNY ‘TalkAbout’: New Museum
Thursday, 4/25, Topic: HAPPIER ENDINGS: How Can We Best Handle Exits, Losses, and Farewells — Personal and Professional?

event_219572792.jpeg

What You Can Do Now:

Want to Join the CNY team?: We have opportunities for professionals with relevant skills to contribute pro bonoto the development of CNY in several important areas:

  • Editorial
  • Calendar-development
  • Funding
  • Media Relations/Social Networking
  • Venue-finding and Evaluation
  • IT/Operations
  • Legal

We are also seeking organizational partners and funding, from public and private agencies who share our interest in fostering a richer cultural life in NYC.

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America’s Direction: What Values & Whose Interests Should Guide Our Choices? – March 28

America’s Direction:
What Values & Whose Interests Should Guide Our Choices?
 
A Socratic Conversation with Ron Gross
Columbia University Campus
(between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenues — 116th St. stop on the #1 train)
Thursday, March 28, 3:45 -5:00 pm
RSVP to grossassoc@aol.com
and at http://www.meetup.com/Conversations-New-York/events/107701172/
Thank you.

Are you concerned about any of the directions in which America seems to be moving?

  • If so, which ones, and why?
  • What would you like to see happen in response?
  • What values should this nation embody, enact, and promote? Liberty? Democracy? Equality? Justice? Tolerance? Opportunity?

There will be light refreshments and a display of relevant books.

Suggest optional reading: The Idea That Is America, by Anne-Marie Slaughter, Basic Books, 2007

Next session: Thursday, 4/25, Topic:HAPPIER ENDINGS: How Can We Best Handle Exits, Losses, and Farewells — Personal and Professional?

Inspired by Socrates’ famous conversations with his friends in the marketplace of 5th century Athens, we engage in spirited discussions of ideas and issues. Socratic conversations range broadly and probe deeply into the basic challenges of life. They are informed by the latest literature for reference and follow up. While building a sense of community on campus, these meetings enliven the intellectual atmosphere and model dialogue and discussion as modes of inquiry. They are part of a year long series of Socratic Conversations hosted by the Gottesman Libraries.

CONVERSATIONS NEW YORK

picture-of-conversation

Imagine…

Hundreds of New Yorkers coming together in small groups of neighbors and fellow citizens to discuss topics of intensive interest…
Hosted at no cost and at convenient locations and times…
Aided by simple guiding principles…
Inspired by the city’s grand tradition of robust conversation…
Our vision is to inspire, organize, publicize, facilitate and celebrate a renaissance of healthy dialogue in New York City.

Join us!

How You Can Help Us Grow!

If you would like to easily add to our strength, we’d be grateful for your taking these easy steps:

1.  Visit us at https://conversationsnewyork.com/ to learn more about us, subscribe to our website, and spread the word.

2.  Share with us your reactions, questions, and suggestions about this venture.  conversationsnewyork@gmail.com

3. ”Like” our organization on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ConversationsNewYork and join   http://www.meetup.com/Conversations-New-York/

4.  Consider convening a Conversation yourself – https://conversationsnewyork.com/resources-for-moderators-2/

5.  Tell us about Conversations you think should be listed on our on-line calendar.  https://conversationsnewyork.com/calendar-of-conversations/
We hope you’re as excited as we are about promoting and encouraging stimulating conversations in New York City!

Socratic Conversation: The School-To-Prison Pipeline: The Effects of “Zero Tolerance” Policies with Natalie Millman, Thursday, March 14th

Socratic Conversation:

The School-To-Prison Pipeline: The Effects of “Zero Tolerance” Policies with Natalie Millman, Thursday, 3/14, 4:45 to 6pm
Where:  Columbia University NY (RSVP to Natalie Millman at NatMillman@gmail.com – required to obtain exact location / address AND at http://www.meetup.com/Conversations-New-York/events/108095812/)

CARTOON-school-2prison

Schools and prisons, at first glance, may appear to have nothing to do with each other. However, “zero tolerance” policies instituted at schools around the country serve to funnel ‘dangerous’ students into prisons. Excessive policing, unequal sentencing, and the expansion of prisons all play a role in this phenomenon.

We will be addressing several questions during this conversation.
What knowledge do you have about this phenomenon from your own experience(s) or studies?

What do you think is more valuable – protecting law-abiding children or investing resources into rehabilitative services?

What would you like to see happen on a national, state, or local level concerning zero tolerance policies and excessive policing in schools?
What can we ourselves do to address the problem?

Suggest optional reading: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/20/denver-school-to-prison-pipeline_n_2725816.html

http://colorlines.com/archives/2013/02/in_2012_florida_arrested_12000_students_in_school–and_that_was_an_improvement.html

***
Inspired by Socrates’ famous conversations with his friends in the marketplace of 5th century Athens, we engage in spirited discussions of ideas and issues. Socratic conversations range broadly and probe deeply into the basic challenges of life. They are informed by the latest literature for reference and follow up. While building a sense of community on campus, these meetings enliven the intellectual atmosphere and model dialogue and discussion as modes of inquiry. They are part of a year long series of Socratic Conversations hosted by the Gottesman Libraries.

This highly-participatory Conversation will be conducted by Natalie Millman, MSW student at Columbia University School of Social Work. Natalie lives in Manhattan and works as an advocate for a variety of issues; her practice specialty is in health and disabilities with an interest in the aging population. Amongst other activities, Natalie teaches writing classes in Manhattan and has facilitated formal conversations for groups since May 2012.

Next session: Thursday, 3/28, Topic: America’s Direction: What Values & Whose Interests Should Guide Our Choices?

Follow CNY at http://www.conversationsnewyork.com.
Like us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/conversationsnewyork.
Want to Join the CNY team?: We have opportunities for professionals with relevant skills to contribute pro bonoto the development of CNY in several important areas:

Editorial
Calendar-development
Funding
Media Relations/Social Networking
Venue-finding and Evaluation
IT/Operations
Legal
We are also seeking organizational partners and funding, from public and private agencies who share our interest in fostering a richer cultural life in NYC.

Ronald Gross Honored for Achievements in Lifelong Learning

Ron-Gross

Ronald Gross Honored for Achievements in Lifelong Learning

Congratulations to Continuing Ed. Contributor Ron Gross!

By , About.com Guide

Updated January 02, 2013

We are so proud to congratulate contributing writer Ron Gross for receiving the 2013 Malcolm S. Knowles Memorial Award of the International Society for Self-Directed Learning! Following is the press release from the University Seminar on Innovation from Columbia University announcing the award:

Ronald Gross will be honored for lifetime achievement in the field of self-directed learning as the 2013 recipient of the Malcolm S. Knowles Memorial Award of the International Society for Self-Directed Learning. He will receive the award at the society’s 27th annual symposium in Cocoa Beach, Florida, February 6-8, 2013.

The award citation states that “Gross has devoted his life and career to advancing lifelong, self-directed learning — through his teaching, publishing, consulting, grant-funded programs and projects, entrepreneurship, professional speaking, activism, innovation, and research.”

Currently, Gross co-chairs the University Seminar on Innovation in Education at Columbia University, where he also holds regular Socratic Conversations with students and faculty. (www.columbiaseminar.org)

Gross’ contributions to the field began in 1977 with the publication of The Lifelong Learner (Simon and Schuster), which was acclaimed by educational and social thinkers including Alvin Toffler, Isaac Asimov, Clark Kerr, John Gardner, Herbert Kohl, John Holt, and Eda LeShan. Feminist author Caroline Bell wrote that the book “tells you where and how the important things are really learned…it is guaranteed to make the world teach you what you really want to know.” Nat Hentoff said, “This is a guide that can change lives. Ronald Gross’ own zest for learning has led him to give the rest of us a marvelous handbook for self-education.” Ivan Illich called the book “not only radical but eminently practical: a rare combination.”

Gross has brought this vision of lifelong learning to major associations, corporations, and government agencies through more than 200 keynote speeches and featured workshops for organizations ranging from the American Academy of Family Physicians to Xerox. He has applied the principles and methodologies of self-directed learning to achieving peak performance and maximizing human potential in diverse fields and throughout the lifespan, from childhood to old age, and in the major professions, through more than 30 major publications. Among them are:

  • Future Directions for Open Learning (National Institute of Education)
  • A Review of Innovative Approaches to College Teaching (American Accounting Association)
  • The Arts and the Poor: New Challenge for Educators (U.S. Office of Education)
  • The New Professionals (Simon and Schuster)
  • Radical School Reform (Simon and Schuster)
  • The New Old: Struggling for Decent Aging (Doubleday)
  • The Children’s Rights Movement (Doubleday)
  • Individualism (Delacorte)

Gross’ most widely used book in lifelong learning and adult education is Peak Learning: How to Create Your Own Lifelong Education Program for Personal Enlightenment and Professional Success (1990), which was so successful that it was re-issued in 1999 “revised and updated for the new century.”

Socrates’ Way: Seven Master Keys to Using Your Mind to the Utmost (Penguin/Tarcher, 2005) used the archetypal educator as a model of self-directed learning, with his principles of Ask Questions, Think for Yourself, Challenge Convention, Know Thyself, Seek the Truth, and Learn with Friends (www.SocratesWay.com). The book has been published in many countries, including Poland, Spain, China, Greece, Mexico, Canada, and Portugal. Based on it, Gross has appeared as Socrates, with major feature coverage wherever he appears, including the San Francisco Chronicle, New York Times, Boston Globe, and others.

As a regular columnist for several publications, Gross has popularized and applied self-directed learning for practitioners in several fields: in the field of adult education over five years for Adult and Continuing Education Today; in the field of meeting and convention management over five years for Convene, the official publication of the Professionals Convention Management Association; and currently for a wider general readership as senior contributor to About.com, the web portal owned by The New York Times, which has 69 million monthly visitors in the U.S. [About.com was sold to Ask.com in 2012]

Gross has also championed self-directed learning at the most advanced levels — intellectual, scholarly, and scientific — in his encouragement of independent scholarship. Starting as senior consultant in 1981-83 for The College Board’s then-new Office of Adult Learning Services, he published two books impelling that movement: Independent Scholarship: Promise, Problems, and Prospects, and The Independent Scholar’s Handbook, and he organized the first national conference in the field, which led to the formation of the National Association of Independent Scholars. Buckminster Fuller wrote about this work:

“If humanity is to pass safely through its present crisis on earth, it will be because a majority of individuals are now doing their own thinking. Ronald Gross’ Independent Scholarship Project has pioneered in improving the climate for such thinking in the United States.”

At the community level, Gross has worked with the public libraries to create and offer Lively Minds, an innovative and award-winning program which he developed for the Nassau (NY) Library System under grants from the Library Services and Construction Act.

Gross has espoused and taught self-directed learning throughout the world, under diverse auspices including in Europe for the European Foundation for Management Development, in the Far East for UNESCO, and in Israel for the Rothschild Foundation.

He has had widespread experience as a consultant, grant awardee, and foundation official, serving at The Ford Foundation, the Fund for the Advancement of Education, and the Aspen Institute for Humanistic Studies, and has received grants and awards from the Fund for the Improvement of Post-Secondary Education, the New York State Education Department, the Philip M. Stern Fund, the Northwest Area Foundation, and the American Hellenic Education Association. He was the associate director of the presidentially-appointed National Commission on Instructional Technology.

Most recently, in 2012 Gross co-founded two new organizations: Conversations New York, a non-profit to encourage and facilitate self-directed learning via community-based discussions throughout Greater New York, as a model for replication in other U.S. cities (www.conversationsnewyork.com); and a consultancy, Life Review and Creative Aging, to foster and support self-directed learning among older adults, under a grant from the Greentree Fund (www.olderbetterwiser.com).

The highly-esteemed award is presented annually by the International Society for Self-Directed Learning to honor Malcolm Knowles for his pioneering contributions to the study and practice of self-direction in learning and to recognize others who have made significant lifelong contributions to the field of self-directed learning.